Journaling Resources and Links

Large India elephant moving and looking straight at you

This one is for my Journaling: Beyond the Diary students — and anyone else interested in journaling. Here are a few links and resources I use. If you have any other recommendations or suggestions, please feel free to leave a comment below. And let me know if you are interested in an online version of my class or workshop.

(Note: Comments are moderated to eliminate spam and trolls, so there is a delay between posting a comment and it going live. Sorry about the inconvenience but the trolls and greedy ruin everything.) And the YouTube videos are collected at the bottom of the post.

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Word Association Exercise

Tiny chihuahua with fake red mohawk hair and spiked leather collar lying on a table

The Word Association Exercise is a discovery exercise. It is designed to help you explore and uncover your unconscious connections between certain concepts. It is especially useful if you find yourself resistant to a task you know will help you achieve a goal or procrastinating on an idea you believe will make your life better in some way. It can also be used when you feel compelled to do something that you believe would have a negative impact on your life. It can also be useful as a journaling prompt or writing exercise.

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Life or Bucket List Exercise

black and white bird taking off from pints tree

What do you want to do or accomplish in your lifetime? This is sometimes called “The Bucket List.” I’m a birder so I prefer “Life List.” Besides, I’d rather focus on life and living it to the fullest than “kicking the bucket” (and the suggested origin of that term is even bleaker). But if you want to create a Bucket List go right ahead. What we are doing is creating a list of all the things we want to do or accomplish before we die.

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The Why Exercise: What’s My Motivation?

redheaded toddler biting lip with question marks

The Why Exercise examines your automatic assumptions, bias, and programming. If you aren’t getting really annoyed or uncomfortable, it’s a good sign you need to keep digging. Knowing why you believe something or are pursuing a goal is increases your motivation. We’re far more likely to exercise because we believe it will reduce the chance of dementia or to reach our goal of completing the London Marathon than if we plan to exercise because our doctor says we should.

This is a great exercise to use whenever you are thinking of buying something or investing time or money in something especially on impulse or if it increases your debt. The Why Exercise causes you to slow down and examine your motivation — and your priorities.

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